Follow us twitter facebook
Edition: Brazil
Click here to subscribe toour free weekly newsletter click here
Markets & trends

Baby beauty products require sensitive approaches

The “baby beauty” trend, targeting parents of those aged four years and under, might be a relatively recent phenomenon but it has taken many countries by storm.

The fact that even in the least child-image conscious country over half of parents with babies are concerned about their children’s looks shows how important this consciousness around baby aesthetics has become,” explains Veronika Zhupanova, analyst at Canadean.

Indeed, a recent research [1] by the consumer insight firm shows that parents around the world pay a great attention to the appearance of their babies.

Organic edible nail polish - such as this one from Kid Licks - can be (...)

Organic edible nail polish - such as this one from Kid Licks - can be positioned as a fun accompaniment to parent-child time, promoting a healthy attitude to baby beauty products.

Parents in South and Central America are the most likely to be concerned about their children’s appearance, with 9 in 10 parents in the area stating that their baby’s looks are important. The least child image conscious consumers are in North America, where 7 in 10 parents have the same attitude. Interestingly, when it comes to country analysis, Russians took the first place, with 98% of parents having the same attitude, whereas New Zealanders came out as the least image conscious, with 53%.

However, brands need to navigate carefully so as to avoid entering the terrain of unethical product positioning whilst still aligning neatly with consumer motivations.

An optimum strategy here would be for manufacturers to promote a holistic approach to a child’s image, placing the primary emphasis on babies’ health, wellbeing and happiness. Doing so will help parents avoid feeling overly pressured about their children’s image, as well as to prevent children from being obsessed with their looks from an early age,” notes Zhupanova.

To further avoid being seen as encouraging image-consciousness among the youngest generation, brands need to focus on the emotive side of the product, such as how it facilitates bonding between parents and children, as opposed to actually enhancing a child’s looks.

Launches such as child-safe nail polish, for example, should be marketed as facilitating mother-daughter bonding, encouraging a healthier approach to a child’s perception of their own image,” adds Zhupanova.

latest news
Focus
Thermolat: Symrise's new warming ingredient

Thermolat: Symrise’s new warming ingredient

Symrise’s new sensory ingredient creates a feeling like gentle warm sunshine on the skin. Thermolat was developed for use in creams, gels and balms to provide pleasant, relaxing and long-lasting effects without feelings of stinging or burning. According to the cosmetic ingredients supplier, 71% of consumers would like to feel an (...)

read more
Experts’ views
Lipotec tackles urban stress

Lipotec
Lipotec tackles urban stress

Modern life brings us many facilities such as running water, electricity, motorization, modern medicine, and many opportunities both in the personal and professional life. But it has also negative effects like pollution, stress, lack of sleep, poor contact with nature, etc. Since the Industrial Revolution in the 18th century, the (...)

read more

Features