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Helen Kupfer-Haas

Bringing brands to life

How can we convey a brand’s core values through multiple sales channels at each stage in the consumer’s experience? A brand’s ten golden rules, based up to now on single sales channels, have been re-evaluated in the past decade and brands have been obliged to break previously unthinkable taboos and explore new avenues.

shutterstock.com © Alphaspirit

shutterstock.com © Alphaspirit

Each brand has almost been forced to re-examine its very essence and to accept that it must rethink its strategy and focus on the target: the end consumer. Direct-sales brands, which concentrate on the structure of their route to market have, in all likelihood, barely any contact with their consumers. How can we, as brands, learn from that, consider multi-sales channels and ensure the shopping experience continues to reflect the brand’s core essence?

Shopping experience as a piece of theatre

To my mind, this is a long road and each entity must ensure it is fully integrated so no detail is missed and the brand is not left with glaring errors in its final message. Brazilian brands must and should innovate and invest in technology. Furthermore, the shopping experience has to be contrived very carefully. Imagine it as a piece of theatre, where light, costumes, script, actors, score, scenery and other details mean the same play could be either outstanding or awful.

A brand has its website (a shop or simply a page). It might also have points of sale, with their design, lighting, merchandising, music and smell. It also has the people who represent it (a sales team, ambassadors?), the way they in turn interact with the customers and the language they use when they talk about the brand and its products, their attentiveness, objectives and so on.

How do you strike a balance and maximise cross-selling while also reaching out to the customer with a consistent message? These dialogues with the brand should take place beyond the physical space, the space should be alive, the contact should be personalised and the sale should consist of three phases: before, during and after.

The beauty of multiple channels is that the brand can be brought to life, from an online to a real world.

Online experience

Online, the website should be more than a catalogue, it should be a fun tool, with a shopping list, geolocation functionality, a system for following up on orders, with entertaining tutorials and opinions on trends in beauty, perfumes and lifestyle. Here, Sephora scores a ten with a brilliant programme called “Hot Now”, which it runs with Pantone and others. The consumer can then physically touch and experience the quality.

The brand can be expressed in a number of ways: in the way customers are greeted; the language the staff use, which must be consistent with the brand’s printed and electronic publications; the look and demeanour of the sales team; the merchandising; the shop’s design, music, packaging, services, promotional presentations and so on. A number of different tools can be employed, provided they are consistent, have been carefully considered and the brand’s core essence is never overlooked.

Returning to my theatre imagery, which was not chosen by chance, the range should be dramatized and brought to life; the visit should be enjoyable, playful and reach beyond the confines of bricks-and-mortar. In other words, if you cannot find your much-loved product in the shop, why not have it sent to your home a few days later?

Shops

The shops themselves need not be identical; they can be tailored to their cities, districts and consumers. Both the Australian Aesop brand (which is owned by Natura) and the American group, Urban Outfitters, have always maintained their values at the core of their discourse, even though each point of sale adapts to its location. Selfridges has created sensational consumer experiences, such as the Fragrance Lab, an innovative concept where the customer is invited to design an exclusive fragrance, which will become their “signature scent”. Phebo and Granado are also outstanding examples of Brazilian vintage brands that have been able to marry tradition and modernity; they have been consistent in their communication and in their product lines and even have admirers abroad.

In my opinion, Brazilian brands have the tools to reinvent the route to market; they just need to use them in the right way. If they do so, a more theatrical approach will reap rewards, particularly recognition and loyalty, including from the younger market.
In the next article I will share details of some of my recent and interesting experiences of brands that have been brought to life.

Helen Kupfer Haas

© 2015 - Brazil Beauty News - www.brazilbeautynews.com

about Helen Kupfer-Haas

Helen Kupfer Haas is a commercial and marketing consultant and distributor for luxury goods between French and Brazilian market. She’s the founder of HKH Brand Boosting, a commercial, marketing consultancy and communications company focuses on luxury lifestyle brands. Helen is also co-founder of ParisMania, a website which organizes among other tours and networking for perfumery, beauty and luxury professionals in Paris.

Agency’s website: www.parismania.com.br

Linkedin : HelenKupferHaas

https://instagram.com/parismaniaofficial/

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